Wednesday, December 15, 2004

Apologist? Me? Not really, but...

You scored as Fideist. You are a fideist! You love to read Soren Kierkegaard, Martin Luther, and Karl Barth. Knowing God is a personal thing, so you believe that the best case for Christianity is made on a subjective level.

Fideist

47%

Classical Apologist

40%

Reformed/Presuppositional Apologist

30%

Evidentialist

23%

Atheist

10%

What kind of apologist are you?
created with QuizFarm.com

Tripp, the AngloBaptist, posted his results from this quiz. I can't quite see the AngloBapist reading (and enjoying) Francis Schaefer(I think though he scored as he did because he reads too much Calvin ;-] ), and I don't know that Fideist is exactly the right label for me. However, if any label puts me in the company of Soren Kierkegaard Martin Luther and Karl Barth, I will gladly be so labeled. To this Lutheran Pietist that seems like very good company indeed. And I do read them and enjoy reading them. Though Luther can be a bit cranky and not enough melancholy for the Goth in me. If you ask me Soren is about as Goth as you can get for a philosopher/theologian.
I do believe that knowing God is a personal (not synonymous with individual) thing (that's just good pietist thinking). It's the claim that I believe the "best case for Christianity" is subjective that sticks in my craw. First I am not one to talk about the case for Christianity as if something is on trial. I believe that there are good reasons to be a Christian and they aren't all subjective ones either, however there are lots of world views that are reasonable and for which one can give a reasonably good case. Lastly, I don't by the subjective/objective dichotomy. Especially, when you are talking about Christianity one must face the actuality of intersubjectivity, that is there is a reality that is more than simply my individual and personal experience on one side and a cold hard reality that I bump up against on the other, rather there is the reality that we experience between persons that is neither simply subjective nor objective. God is one/three of these persons.